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Lumberton Ledger

 

 

 

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Lumberton, Texas 77657

 

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Lumberton, Texas 77657

 

Phone: 409-751-5334

 

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© 2019 by Lumberton Ledger

Taxable vs. Nontaxable Income

March 20, 2019

All income is taxable unless the law specifically excludes it, but as you might have guessed, there's more to it than that. With that in mind, let's take a closer look at taxable vs. nontaxable income.

 

Taxable Income

Taxable income includes any money you receive, such as wages and tips, but it can also include non-cash income from property or services. For example, both parties in a barter exchange must include the fair market value of goods or services received as income on their tax return.

Tip Income. If you get tips on the job from customers, that income is subject to taxes. Here's what you should keep in mind when it comes to receiving tips on the job:

* Tips are taxable. You must pay federal income tax on any tips you receive. The value of non-cash tips, such as tickets, passes or other items of value are also subject to income tax.

* Include all tips on your income tax return. You must include the total of all tips you received during the year on your income tax return. This includes tips directly from customers, tips added to credit cards and your share of tips received under a tip-splitting agreement with other employees.

* Report tips to your employer. If you receive $20 or more in tips in any one month, from any one job, you must report your tips for that month to your employer. The report should only include cash, check, debit and credit card tips you receive. Your employer is required to withhold federal income, Social Security and Medicare taxes on the reported tips. Do not report the value of any noncash tips to your employer.

* Keep a daily log of tips. Use the Employee's Daily Record of Tips and Report to Employer (IRS Publication 1244), to record your tips.

Bartering Income. Bartering is the trading of one product or service for another. Small businesses sometimes barter to get products or services they need. For example, a plumber might trade plumbing work with a dentist for dental services. Typically, there is no exchange of cash. If you barter, the value of products or services from bartering is taxable income. Here are four facts about bartering that you should be aware of:

Barter exchanges. A barter exchange is an organized marketplace where members barter products or services. Some exchanges operate out of an office and others over the Internet. All barter exchanges are required to issue Form 1099-B, Proceeds from Broker and Barter Exchange Transactions. The exchange must give a copy of the form to its members who barter and file a copy with the IRS.

Bartering income. Barter and trade dollars are the same as real dollars for tax purposes and must be reported on a tax return. Both parties must report as income the fair market value of the product or service they get.

Tax implications. Bartering is taxable in the year it occurs. The tax rules may vary based on the type of bartering that takes place. Barterers may owe income taxes, self-employment taxes, employment taxes or excise taxes on their bartering income.

Reporting rules. How you report bartering on a tax return varies. If you are in a trade or business, you normally report it on Form 1040, Schedule C, Profit or Loss from Business.

 

Nontaxable Income

Here are some types of income that are usually not taxable:

* Gifts and inheritances

* Child support payments

* Welfare benefits

* Damage awards for physical injury or sickness

* Cash rebates from a dealer or manufacturer for an item you buy

* Reimbursements for qualified adoption expenses

In addition, some types of income are not taxable except under certain conditions, including:

* Life insurance proceeds paid to you are usually not taxable. But if you redeem a life insurance policy for cash, any amount that is more than the cost of the policy is taxable.

* Income from a qualified scholarship is normally not taxable. This means that amounts you use for certain costs, such as tuition and required books, are not taxable. However, amounts you use for room and board are taxable.

* If you received a state or local income tax refund, the amount may be taxable. You should have received a 2018 Form 1099-G from the agency that made the payment to you. If you didn't get it by mail, the agency may have provided the form electronically. Contact them to find out how to get the form. Be sure to report any taxable refund you received even if you did not receive Form 1099-G.

 

Questions about Taxable vs. Nontaxable Income?

If you have any questions or would like more information about taxable and nontaxable income, don't hesitate to contact the office today.

With over 30 years’ financial expertise, Todd Hickman co-hosts a weekly financial radio show on NewsTalk 560AM KLVI in Beaumont, Texas and Talk 1370 AM KJCE in Austin, Texas. You can reach Todd during the week at 409-840-6900 or by visiting his company’s website at http://savemyretirement.com. Asset Growth Associates is celebrating its 20th year in business.

Take a free short quiz to see if your investments are in alignment with your risk tolerance. Topics cover portfolio size, financial goals, what you’re willing to risk for potential gains... Then we’ll pinpoint your exact Risk Number to guide the decision making process. Visit http://whatismyrisknumber.com.

Call today and speak to a tax and accounting professional you can trust. Detailed guides outlining subject matters such as Life Events, Business Strategies, Investment Strategies, Tax Strategies and the answers to 500 every day financial questions can be found free at http://savemyretirement.com.

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