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Lumberton Ledger

 

 

 

Physical Address:

1238 S. Main

Lumberton, Texas 77657

 

Mailing Address:

P.O. Box 8031

Lumberton, Texas 77657

 

Phone: 409-751-5334

 

Email:

editor@lumbertonledger.com

lisa@lumbertonledger.com

 

 

© 2019 by Lumberton Ledger

Tax Tips for Ages 50 and Over

January 23, 2019

Everyone wants to save money on their taxes, and older Americans are no exception. If you're age 50 or older, here are six tax tips that could help you do just that.

1. Standard Deduction for Seniors. 
If you and/or your spouse are 65 years old or older and you do not itemize your deductions, you can take advantage of a higher standard deduction amount. There is an additional increase in the standard deduction if either you or your spouse is blind.

 

2. Credit for the Elderly or Disabled. 
If you and/or your spouse are either 65 years or older--or under age 65 years old and are permanently and totally disabled--you may be able to take the Credit for Elderly or Disabled. The credit is based on your age, filing status, and income.
You may only take the credit if you meet the following requirements:
• Your income on Form 1040 line 38 must be less than $17,500 ($20,000 if married filing jointly and only one spouse qualifies), $25,000 (married filing jointly and both qualify), or $12,500 (married filing separately and lived apart from your spouse for the entire year).
• The non-taxable part of your Social Security or other nontaxable pensions, annuities or disability income is less than $5,000 (single, head of household, or qualifying widow/er with dependent child); $5,000 (married filing jointly and only one spouse qualifies); $7,500 (married filing jointly and both qualify); or $3,750 (married filing separately and lived apart from your spouse the entire year).

 

3. Retirement Account Limits Increase.

Once you reach age 50, you are eligible to contribute (and defer paying tax on) up to $24,500 in 2018 ($25,000 in 2019). The amount includes the additional $6,000 "catch up" contribution for employees aged 50 and over who participate in 401(k), 403(b), most 457 plans, and the federal government's Thrift Savings Plan.

 

4. Early Withdrawal Penalty Eliminated. 
If you withdraw money from an IRA account before age 59 1/2 you generally must pay a 10 percent penalty (there are exceptions, please call the office for details); however, once you reach age 59 1/2, there is no longer a penalty for early withdrawal. Furthermore, if you leave or are terminated from your job at age 55 or older (age 50 for public safety employees), you may withdraw money from a 401(k) without penalty--but you still have to pay tax on the additional income. To complicate matters, money withdrawn from an IRA is not exempt from the penalty.

 

5. Social Security Benefits.

Americans can sign up for social security benefits as early as age 62 or wait to receive full benefits at age 66 or 67 (depending on your full retirement age). For some older Americans however, social security benefits may be taxable. How much of your income is taxed depends on the amount of your benefits plus any other income you receive. Generally, the more income you have coming in, the more likely it is that a portion of your social security benefits will be taxed. Therefore, when preparing your return, it is advisable to be especially careful when calculating the taxable amount of your Social Security.

 

6. Higher Income Tax Filing Threshold.

Taxpayers who are 65 and older are allowed an income of $1,600 more ($2,600 married filing jointly and both spouses are 65 or older) before they need to file an income tax return. In other words, older taxpayers age 65 and older with income of $13,600 ($26,600 married filing jointly) or less may not need to file a tax return.
Don't hesitate to call the office if you have any questions about these and other tax deductions and credits available for older Americans. 
With over 30 years’ financial expertise, Todd Hickman co-hosts a weekly financial radio show on NewsTalk 560AM KLVI in Beaumont, Texas and Talk 1370 AM KJCE in Austin, Texas. You can reach Todd during the week at 409-840-6900 or by visiting his company’s website at http://savemyretirement.com. 
Take a free short quiz to see if your investments are in alignment with your risk tolerance. Topics cover portfolio size, financial goals, what you’re willing to risk for potential gains... Then we’ll pinpoint your exact Risk Number to guide the decision making process. Visit http://whatismyrisknumber.com.
Call today and speak to a tax and accounting professional you can trust. Detailed guides outlining subject matters such as Life Events, Business Strategies, Investment Strategies, Tax Strategies and the answers to 500 every day financial questions can be found free at http://savemyretirement.com.

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